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The ADO.NET Entity Data Model Designer Extension Starter Kit is a Visual Studio project template that helps you understand how to extend the functionality of the ADO.NET Entity Data Model Tools. The project template provides you with a custom Visual Studio project type (ADO.NET Entity Designer Extension Starter Kit) that uses classes in the Microsoft.Data.Entity.Design.Extensibility namespace to build a Visual Studio extension that you can deploy and test. This ADO.NET Entity Designer Extension Starter Kit project type provides you with a project that extends the Entity Data Model Tools in the following ways:

* The Entity Data Model Wizard adds a custom structural annotation to each generated entity type in the conceptual model and displays a message box that contains information about the model generation process.

* The Update Model Wizard adds a custom structural annotation to each added entity type in the conceptual model and displays a message box that contains information about the model update process.

* The ADO.NET Entity Data Model Designer (Entity Designer) adds a custom annotation element to entity types when they are selected in the Entity Designer or Model Browser.

This starter kit also contains placeholder classes for customizing other functionality. By writing code for these classes you can do the following:

* Extend the way the Entity Designer loads and saves .edmx files.

* Enable the Entity Designer to load custom files and convert them to .edmx files.

* Enable the Entity Designer to save files in a custom format.

To use the starter kit you should be familiar with the following technologies:

* The Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4 versions of the ADO.NET Entity Data Model Tools and the ADO.NET Entity Framework.

* The basic principles of the Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF).

* Basic programming concepts and the Visual C# programming environment.



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Last edited Sep 23 2009 at 6:22 PM  by BrianSwanMSFT, version 1
Comments
juliako wrote  Mar 5 2010 at 12:42 AM  
The ADO.NET Entity Data Model Designer Extension Starter Kit has been updated to work with Visual Studio 2010 RC bits.

Weitzhandler wrote  Sep 1 2010 at 8:09 PM  
I wish there would have been a VB.NET download as well.
Since the edmx file is an XML file, there is no better language for XML than VB.NET (q.v. XML Literals).
It's waste of time working with XML under C#.

sgeek7 wrote  May 30 2012 at 4:10 PM  
It would be nice to have a Visual Studio 11 Entity Framework 5 version

andysmi wrote  Nov 4 2012 at 9:07 PM  
I would like to see a version that works with Entity Framework 5 / Visual Studio 2012 version too. Please do it!!

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