Search Wiki:
Resource Page Description
Windows PowerShell is a Windows command-line shell designed for ease-of-use not only by system administrators but also for application and system developers. The shell includes an interactive prompt and a scripting environment that can be used independently or in combination. PowerShell V2 is available by default with both R2 and Windows 7 and, via an optional update, previous versions of Windows.

For Developers specifically, Windows PowerShell in combination with the Windows Management Infrastructure (WinRM, WS-Management, WMI) provides a great way to automate server hosted solutions. For example, if you implement all your administration logic via PowerShell, then layer the MMC GUI over the top (i.e. MMC calls PowerShell to get the work done) - you will have given your Enterprise customers the absolute best of all worlds; GUIs, scripting, and delegated, remote automation.

Unlike most scripting shells, which accept and return text, Windows PowerShell is integrated with the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) and the .NET Framework, and thus deals in .NET objects instead of just text strings. This fundamental change in the environment brings entirely new tools and methods to the management and configuration of Windows. Application Developers may extend their solutions with custom PowerShell based object models which integrate seamlessly with platform management solutions.

Like many shells, Windows PowerShell gives you access to the file system on the computer. In addition, Windows PowerShell providers enable you to access other data stores, such as the registry and the digital signature certificate stores, as easily as you access the file system.

Version 2 of Windows Powershell introduces an array of new features including remote sessions, an integrated script environment, debugging tools, and much more.



**Delete the following note before publishing **

This resource page is currently in setup mode and only available to coordinators and developers. Once you have finished setting up your resource page you can publish it to make it available to all MSDN Code Gallery visitors.

To get your Resource Page ready to publish, you should do the following:
  1. Make any changes to the details of your resource page
    1. Here you can enable or disable functions of your resource page. You might want to turn on the Issue Tracker to allow users to provide feedback on your resource, or if you have a resource that does not involve a code sample, you may want to turn off the Releases tab.
    2. Make sure your resource page description is detailed enough to let people search for your resource.
  2. Add your code sample or other resources to the resource page
    1. If you’re uploading code, go to the Releases tab and create a new release to house your code. Creating a release allows you to have the license properly displayed when people download your code, as well as provides a download count.
    2. Edit your Wiki page to attach any resources you may have that are not source code.
  3. If you want to let someone see your resource page before it is published, go to the People tab and add them to your resource page
    1. This will let you add other team members who may be contributing to your resource, or just show it off and get feedback from someone you trust.
  4. Tag your resource page with descriptive tags to make it easier for people to find your resources when browsing the gallery.
  5. Publish your resource page so it becomes visible to everyone!

Additional information on starting a new resource page is available here: Resource Page Startup Guide.
Last edited Apr 9 2009 at 5:38 PM  by philpenn, version 1
Comments
DSotnikov wrote  Jul 28 2009 at 9:30 AM  
More items for the community resources:

Forums at http://powergui.org
My blog: http://dmitrysotnikov.wordpress.com
Twitter bot with PowerShell v2 tips: http://www.twitter.com/PowerGUIorg

Updating...
Page view tracker